reviews of squirrel

I’ve been homeless three times, struggled with depression and wrote my first book whilst living in a park.
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My old bedroom…
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squirrelbags
Read the reviews below of The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness – the book that changed my life
(got me out of the park, and into a bed).
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Then buy it by clicking on one of these links, it’s only a few quid, you get a truly original book, I make £1. Everyone is happy.
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Thank you. x

Squirrel UK Amazon link:

http://bit.ly/STDOM

Squirrel US Amazon link:

http://bit.ly/USSquirrel

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5.0 out of 5 stars Immense, you have to read this!
By Abbo (London) – See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
This story is wonderful. A true story, it is about so many things: having the passion to follow your dreams and become the person you’re supposed to be – even if that means being homeless and sleeping rough in a London park on the way to becoming an author, as Craig Stone is now, and who will be a name more and more people read, know and love. It’s also about society’s hierarchy and how harsh it is to be at the bottom, although it gives much food for thought on this, and a conclusion that it’s better to be free than be a robotic unemotional suit going through life with closed eyes. It’s about the insane and the inane, the rules that pervade our small worlds, and the unconventional. The book writes all this in its own way, and in the beautiful rhythmic style that I loved in the author’s sequel to this, Life Knocks. There are also farcical qualities to this story, loads of laugh-out loud moments, and the farce that it builds up to at the end is sheer brilliance (and it actually happened which is insane!). I’m now a big fan of Craig Stone’s writing style and stories, simple as that. I look forward to another one, and urge anyone who’s not read Life Knocks or this one to read them. These books are in my all-time favourites.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Madness can also be brilliance, By Steve – See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Another beautifully crafted read from the author of the quite brilliant ‘Life Knocks’.
Making an attempt to sum up this book in a brief review is more challenging than rescuing a stubborn African grey parrot from a tall tree, armed with a ladder, a fictional park keeper and a finger sucking naked mentalist.
My talents don’t extend that far. So suffice to say that this is one of the most creative, mind expanding books you’ll find. You will laugh (a lot!), cringe, cry, smile, laugh again and find it impossible to put this down.
Read Life Knocks before you read this. You’ll love them both.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Having read Life Knocks I had to read The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness. Like Life Knocks, it’s very different to anything I’ve read before, and I struggled to put it down. One minute I was laughing hysterically, the next close to tears. I love the different stories within the story, all woven together very cleverly.
Bizarre and strangely beautiful, more please Mr Stone!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Total Madness
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
I came away from chapter five questioning my own sanity and rushed downstairs to resume the routine of normality and throw open the windows on this sunny day in the hope I might start to feel right again. A cup of tea and two slices of toast later and the feelings of living in the mind of the slightly unusual are starting to fade but not half as quickly as I would like. This search for myself is all very well but I keep reading about people who left it all to live in a park and escape from their reality and routine of life. What an escape. Unsurprisingly, they all seem to be men. I can’t imagine a woman purposely leaving the safety and sanctity of her home to go and live with her bags and a sleeping bag between herself and other human beings. The thought of doing it myself terrifies me and I have been known to do some stupid things in my time. However, I do like a bit of control and, for me, living in a park and exposing my mind to itself, isn’t something I can really recommend to myself as a ‘good idea’. The thing which gives me pause, (and I also pause to admit to it), is that, like him, I could write like that. Unlike him, I would probably not let anyone else read it. What a brave man!
Having come to the end of the book, which incidentally kept me reading all day, I can say I enjoyed it. There are moments in there where the writer has written down thoughts many of us have had but probably wouldn’t admit to for fear of sounding a bit barking. However, I think therein lies the joy and meat of this book. I may have to visit a park, find a tree I feel comfortable naming Enid Blyton and see what comes from the pen.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Great book. Had me absolutely pissing myself. Characters are amazing and completely original. Craig Stone’s brain laid out on paper is a gem. I highly recommend you read this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars TOTALLY enjoyable and unique book
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
I’m reading books by many different authors to get an idea of writing styles in case I actually ever get my own book completed. In all my reading, there has been nothing that compares to The Squirrel That Dreamt of Madness. It’s a truly insightful book as well as thoroughly entertaining. I’ve always known the problems of homeless people (lack of food, shelter, water, showers) but never thought about the added issues of threats from other homeless people, protecting what little possessions they have, fear of going mad and how we view them (or avoid viewing them) affects them as well. This book brings all that to the forefront but in such an entertaining, fun way. Craig Stone has a way of describing things like no one else. I read his blog and tweets before I read the book and realizing it was partly what actually happened during his stay at London’s Gladstone Park (check it out on Google Maps) and partly what he imagined might happen to a homeless person makes the whole story even more intriguing. This book is definitely worth every penny!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Great book. Had me absolutely pissing myself. Characters are amazing and completely original. Craig Stone’s brain laid out on paper is a gem. I highly recommend you read this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, original and funny
 This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Mr. Stone has a unique way of looking at the world. This gives him a unique voice, which is a breath of fresh air amongst the current crop of offerings. The characters quickly endear themselves to you and suck you deeper into the story, which is sometimes bizarre, sometimes funny, sometimes surreal, but always original.
Great book!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Madness, indeed, if you don’t read this!
By Mairead A Anderson (Dublin Ireland) – See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
I follow this chap on twitter, I like his tweets, a little off the wall, which is always good. But I was not prepared for the off the wall, floor and roofness of this book. Out there just doesnt do it justice. And I loved it. Or rather I loved that it made me stop reading sometimes because I couldn’t read any more, it was too raw, too painful, too damm human. But this was softened by the laugh out loud moments, guaranteed to have your fellow commuters give you a wide berth on the journey home.
Do yourself a favour. Read it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Weird, enjoyable and recommended.
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Not my usual reading material and in some places slightly too bizarre, I nevertheless enjoyed this book very much. Its good to be challenged, occasionally!
The narrative is intentionally ambiguous with regard to what is really happening to the “hero” and what is part of some kind of fevered imaginings, which was intriguing but occasionally frustrating. This is, to some extent, clarified at the end, for which I was grateful, and the author’s final notes made the whole experience more complete.
Well worth reading.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Are you mad? Of course this book should be published.
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
A brilliant piece of work. Brought out all sorts of emotions from me. I laughed and felt fear, sadness, anger, etc. The descriptive writing is some of the best I have come across – as incredible as an ant who finds a piece of ambergris on a beach and sells it to a visiting martian for a new crumb of bread that it could carry.
Buy this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars best book I’ve ever read!
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
My first English teacher was an accomplished author and he always encouraged us to be as expressive as we could,even if that meant making words up. I have never really found a book that describes the point he was trying to make, until I stumbled across the squirrel that dreamt of madness. The author takes the most mundane situation and paints it to overflowing with so many bright,unbelievable and colourful expressions, it is just a delight to read.I also love the fact that this book opens up the imagination of the reader to point that your imagination can place all the happenings of this book into their own life.Is that really just a homeless guy in the park? Excellent from start to finish!
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Jeanie Clemmens

May 23, 2013 Jeanie Clemmens rated it 5 of 5 stars

At the end of the book, (No spoiler here) an interviewer talks with the author, Craig Stone, calling him a master of metaphor. He is indeed. The story of a man living homeless in a London park by choice is delightful, colorful and dotted sometimes with poignancy. At one point, Colossus Sosloss, the main character describes his plight as trying to pin a carrot on the tale of donkey when the carrot is as big as the donkey. There are wise original adages interspersed with insightful descriptions and actions. A very good read that is like literary stand-up comedy mixed with lively narrative.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I effing you dare you to read it. Double, triple dog dare you!!
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
If you are one of those uptight folks who cannot suspend disbelief, you have no business reading literature in the first place. Despite this caution I will adamantly insist to you that I with all my soul believed every single word of this tale, no matter how tall or small it got as I traversed. I could compare his consistency in tone to that of Mark Twain or his turns of phrase to the psychedelic wordings of Tom Robbins but to do either would be to grossly under-describe the deftness with which my mind has been permanently altered by this work by Craig Stone.blank
5.0 out of 5 stars best book I’ve ever read!
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
My first English teacher was an accomplished author and he always encouraged us to be as expressive as we could,even if that meant making words up. I have never really found a book that describes the point he was trying to make, until I stumbled across the squirrel that dreamt of madness. The author takes the most mundane situation and paints it to overflowing with so many bright,unbelievable and colourful expressions, it is just a delight to read.I also love the fact that this book opens up the imagination of the reader to point that your imagination can place all the happenings of this book into their own life.Is that really just a homeless guy in the park? Excellent from start to finish!
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Sarah Williams
This book is actually the funniest thing I have ever read in my life. I enjoy a humorous book but up until now had never found one that actually made me laugh out loud. This book made me laugh out loud. I laughed so much I cried. I laughed so much that other members of my family stopped what they were doing to stare at me and ask me what on earth was so funny. Suicidal budgies are funny – and I know that sounds wrong – but in context, suicidal budgies are hysterical. The author has a great talent for clever humour and word play and what I would almost describe as Python-esq humour. As well as being funny this book has an engaging storyline, interesting plot twists and a protagonist who is hugely likeable. Everything about this book just clicked for me and I’ll definitely be on the look out for further books by this author. Highly recommended.
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Do you ever wish you could quit your mind numbingly tedious job? Feel like you’re dangerously close to telling your employer precisely where they can lodge their pay freeze? Now you need not follow through thanks to one guy who already did (well, he did the former anyway). Choosing voluntary homelessness rather than voluntary redundancy, Craig Stone set up ‘home’ in a London park in the guise of main character Colossus Sosloss. Armed with a 450 GSM sleeping bag from Argos, a pad and a pen the result is a rip roaring wondrous actual laugh out loud funny adventure as he chronicles the days that followed.Just reading a few existing reviews sucked me right into the world of Colossus. I had to buy the book and find out more of what it was all about. I thoroughly enjoyed the white knuckle ride through Gladstone Park it whisked me off on, meeting such richly woven colourful characters like the midget park keeper who ‘looks like two pillows tied together with old rope stuffed into a bag with a worried face drawn onto it by a gorilla with arthritis.’ Then there’s Moonface, ‘a fat ginger man up a tree that looks like a space hopper with anger issues’, not to mention Dorangel Vargus and PC Whirled. There’s even a cameo from the voice of Stephen Fry as a human sized fox wearing a lab coat.There should be a warning on the cover about reading it in the presence of others because you will end up laughing raucously at the turn of every page. A worthy example is the discussion about how it seems to be common for superheroes to turn bad in their third movie outing. Colossus asks if, ‘In Lassie three, will Lassie grow a beard, smoke cigarettes and push kids down wells and lock them in abandoned mines?’ The imagery this paints is a pure delight. And I can’t imagine anywhere else you’ll find a list of ways to kill a budgie some of which include, ‘cooking them in a sandwich, drowning them in a bath (with weights) and kick them in the balls.’ From Colossus sized carrots to the intricately detailed description of how the animals communicated when trying to decide how to deal with the animal murderer stalking the park are simply sublime.Humour is not all Craig has in his bag but if it was he does it so well it would be more than enough to propel you all the way to the end still wanting more. There are also poignant stories invoking feelings of sadness and pity. How wonderful to have one’s emotions played with in a way that can sadly be missing in stories today. There are wonderful moments of philosophical clarity and observational genius. Others offer an existential reflection echoing thoughts on issues resonating with many people as we try to find our place in a heavily saturated trend loving routine laden world; a world where anyone with an original personality is often pigeonholed as a geek, an eccentric or even worse, a weirdo.
With a flawless flow to the whole story demonstrated by the effortless way Craig goes off on several tangents he keeps the writing eloquently cohesive. Not a word is out of place. Here is a new writer with a unique voice, both distinctive and original making this not only a ‘must’ read for all but an ‘if you don’t read it you will pay for it bitterly in the afterlife (whether or not you believe in an afterlife is immaterial)’ kind of book.
Just when you near the end and think it couldn’t possibly get better you’re faced with an interesting if unexpected twist. For me, this really finished it on what was already going to be a mountainous high.
So if you want to discover how Colossus ended up getting beaten up while dressed as a fish finger sandwich I urge you to buy this book! To wrap up I’ll use the words of his landlord who told him when he packed up his belongings and moved out, ‘I will miss you Colossus Sosloss colossally.’
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Carey Parrish
This rather delightful book is the debut novel for British writer Craig Stone. Aptly titled “The Squirrel That Dreamt of Madness,” the book tells the story of a man’s departure from the world he knows and into that of one who lives in a park, unemployed, homeless, and amuses himself by creating stories around those who inhabit the park with him.Inspired by true events from the author’s life, the reader gets a look inside the mind of one who just chucked it all because the “little voice” in his head told him so, and he decided to listen. In the park there is a cast of characters to keep our hero occupied that includes the Park Keeper, who happens to be a midget with anger management issues, and a chubby dude called Moonface who lives up a tree because he broke both ankles escaping from a hospital and now he believes if he comes down the “floor will bite him.” There’s Matt who looks after Moonface, someone our narrator doesn’t really care for, and a policeman named PC Whirled. Madness the Parrott is a favorite of all the park’s inhabitants and Dorangel Vargas, who kills animals, is in a world unto himself.The narrator, who calls himself Colossus Sosloss, spends his days interacting with all these miscreants and his observations of life, and the reason he’s there in the first place, keep bringing him back to a reality that he tried to leave behind when he chose to become homeless at the book’s outset.”Better to live dreaming than dream of living” is a tagline that will stay with you after the story is told. Craig Stone has created a virtual world for himself in “The Squirrel That Dreamt of Madness” and its one that readers should visit. For there isn’t a dull moment in the whole escapade. Well done.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Surreal
kehs (Hertfordshire, England) – See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)
Surreal. Quirky. Fantastical nonsense. Meandering thoughts that somehow connect to become fascinating insights. This story of a young man quitting the rat race and going to live in a park is every bit as mad as it sounds – but at the same time it’s absolutely brilliant. I imagined it was going to be an amusing, light hearted read but in fact it is so much more. The back story combined with the here and now brings the reader along on a bizarre adventure. Although filled with humour this book also has moments of great poignancy. There is a depth of emotion in here that is rarely expressed so eloquently or in such a unique style. I learnt something very important too – never look up into the trees! Definitely one for my keepers shelf.
I am so pleased I bumped into him on Twitter otherwise I may well have missed this brilliant author. I enjoyed this read so much that I’ve already started on his other book Life Knocks.
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Maree Kimberley
I can’t remember if I found & followed Craig Stone on twitter, or if he followed me first. Either way it doesn’t matter, the important thing is that I found him and so read his piece of indie fiction insanity titled The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness.If you read Craig’s tweets you’ll soon realise he lets his brain wander down paths most of us are too afraid to explore. And Squirrel is an accurate reflection of the weird and wonderful gifts hidden within his neurons that made me laugh out loud, cringe, feel a little bit queasy, frown in confusion and, of course, cheer for Colossus, the story’s unlikely hero.This is not an ordinary book. Stone breaks all the writing rules written and a few that are only whispered behind closed doors. But it works. It’s a page turner like no other I’ve ever read. He goes off in tangents that seem to make no sense, but of course they eventually do. If you’ve ever seen the comedian Ross Noble live shows, the zig zagging of his stories that start and wander off this way and that but eventually come to a conclusion, you’ll have some idea of how Stone’s fiction works.It is completely mental in the best possible way. Just read it. It’s bloody fantastic.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The best of 2012
By Craig Lewis (glasgow uk) – See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
This is the most innotive book I have read since Douglas Adams passed away (RIP). I am reading it like a bible, a few pages at a time just to be able to fully appreciate all of the little details and highlight my favorite bits. A must read and a must buy so Craig Stone can write more. All ready waiting for his next novel.Tell everyone you know and even those you dont. Just stop random people on the street and tell them about it.
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Jan Ruth
Philosophy in the Park
*Second Edition.*
Philosophy and humour go together very well, don’t you think? The heavyweight thoughts that rumble around in our subconscious and question who we are, what we are doing and why, needs to be balanced with some off-the-wall story telling; just to render it palatable and help us digest what the author is trying to say.
Brave, or plain daft, to give up a job and a home to go and live in the local park? To be free of the baggage society insists we carry.
In this multi-coloured monologue, Craig Stone takes people watching (and the minutiae of life watching) to a whole new level.
Times of fear, loneliness and desperation are to be expected, but to wrench so much humour out of the misery makes for some clever, lively narrative.
I laughed, a lot.
My other half wanted to know what on earth was I reading? So I told him that it was about a man trying to discover the The Meaning of Life in a London Park. A park where the trees had names like Enid Blyton and Jeffrey Archer, and he has all sorts of adventures and gets into a lot of sticky situations with dog mess and… other sticky situations, both real and imagined. It’s kind of Alice in Wonderland meets Freud… or something like that?
Original; at times thought provoking and at all other, the crazy workings of a deliciously over-active mind
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C.p. Bialois
When I started reading the Squirrel That Dreamt Of Madness by Craig Stone I was at first intrigued by the idea of the story of a homeless man living in a park. The way the story unfolded reminded me of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye in that the main character took it upon himself to demonstrate that one’s life didn’t have to be as constricting and lifeless as it seems. The character, named Colossus Sosloss, walks away from his job, home, and friends to prove that one doesn’t need society to make something of themselves. While living in a park for ten days he meets quite a group of characters Including a midget groundskeeper that doesn‘t like him, Moonface an insane man that follows him everywhere, and Matt, the lone groundskeeper that treats him with any dignity.From the beginning of the story the author shares the random thoughts and quips everyone has throughout their daily lives but few, if any, confess to it. While funny and entertaining it also helps keep the feeling of the book light instead of the potential depressing nature of the material. As it progresses further those comedic thoughts turned into hilarious actions as Colossus is caught in, or a part of, several acts that aren’t bad alone but when combined with the predicament he finds himself in prove to be hilarious. I was very pleased to find that some of the seemingly random side stories serve an important purpose to the conclusion.This was a very good read that I thoroughly enjoyed and would recommend to anyone that enjoys a good story. At times you’ll feel for Colossus and at others you’ll agree with his self-assessment of being an idiot. You’ll laugh and may even cry, but in the end you’ll be happy you read it.
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Rebecca
Never in a million years did I expect to like this book. A story based on a man living homeless in a park? I thought how mundane, right? Boy,was I ever wrong!! Absolutely one of the best books I have ever read. He is not only hilarious in his story telling, but he describes things in a most creative way you would never imagine (or could for that matter). Craig is a deep thinker and that comes across in the metaphors he uses in his descriptions of people and events in the book. This book made me feel many emotions; laughter,sadness,terror but mostly I laughed. This book was truly hard to put down. He captivates your imagination and his story flows so well I found it hard to find a stopping point to bookmark. This is a story that has a “M. Night Shyamalan” story twist, in my opinion and I loved it! This book is like a really good movie that you want to watch over and over again and each time you see/read it you get something new out of it you missed the first time around! I was sad when I came to the end of the book, it is just that good! I look forward to his next book!
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M.R. Cornelius
I had no idea what to expect when I started reading this book. Halfway down the first page, I realized I stumbled into the peculiar world of Craig Stone. His disjointed, stream-of-consciousness writing reminded me of Hunter S. Thompson on a drug-induced rant. His metaphors take the most unlikely combinations and make them fit.”A rumble in the distance belches across the sky like God may be discovering that he is intolerant to wheat.”Kudos to Stone for persevering when traditional publishing houses backed away from this book. They don’t know what they missed. And thanks to Stone for warning me not to forget to look up in the trees.
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Cinta
Cinta rated it 5 of 5 stars
It is funny. It is clever. It is witty. It is deep. It is sad sometimes. It is a lot of things that make you fall head first into this story, making you read and read and read, not knowing when you are going to put the book down. The story of Colossus Sosloss, who got tired of living an empty life and tried to escape from the solitude he was feeling, despite being surrounded by lots of people. Colossus leaves everything and becomes part of the anonymous crowd of homeless people who live in parks. This is a clever story of how he tried to survive in Gladstone Park, even when facing some unexpected and nasty events.
In a very witty, clever, and funny tone, Craig Stone makes the reader think about the world and everyday life of those homeless people who live around us, and who we seem to ignore or who we simply don’t even see. At the same time, through Colossus’s story we are told an important lesson about appearances and the opinion that people can have of others depending on their situation or looks.
Very rich in metaphors, it may seem to be a difficult book to read. On the contrary, the metaphors are easily recognizable, and we all can understand what it is being said there. This story contains other stories within, that help to understand the overall context of the book.
If you enjoy satirical, funny, very clever stories, this is the book for you. I have given to it 5 stars, but only because I cannot give it 10. One of the best books I have read this year so far.
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Lisa Shambrook
I smile whenever I think about this book!
I was caught up immediately with the characters…if only in desperation to actually find out the lead’s name! I giggled, shivered, snorted, bit my lip, chuckled and laughed out loud much to chagrin of my family…though my reactions did encourage my daughter to read it too!
Incredibly unique in its vision and setting, this book is literally a lexicon of madness. The use of metaphor and description was original and kept me glued to Stone’s vivid writing. Several different stories developed…and I must admit to confusion at times (but in a good way!) and wondered how it would all fit together, but fit together it did and to marvellous effect! It was comedic, horrific, sad, beautiful and touching all at once.
This book will keep you entertained in a way you have never been before…and even when you think you know what will happen…you won’t!
Well worth a read and some extreme escapism! I guarantee you won’t be bored!
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Sharon Buchbinder
If Jonathan Winters, Robin Williams AND Tibor Fischer married and had a child, this author would be their son. A manic walk in the park brings the reader closer to jealous trees, giant caterpillars, angry park attendants and the role of the marginalized person sitting next to you on that broken down park bench. Yes, that one, the person you just slid away from because he had a distinct eau de je ne sais quoi about him. In this book, laugh out loud moments alternate with poignant insights into humanity–and the lack thereof. If we are only human by the abode we own, then what were our ancestors who lived in caves? By today’s standards, they were bums. Yet, by Neanderthal caste systems, dark, stinky caverns ruled. Once again, we are reminded that appearances are deceiving. And while I do NOT recommend that you chat up the next homeless person you see, I do suggest that he or she is or was someone’s child, father, mother, brother, uncle, aunt, or cousin and that we can all spare a crumb or two of compassion.
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eNovel Reviews
The British author, Craig Stone, is as interesting a person as the characters he creates. Miserable at his day job, he decided to take a leap of faith. His path to success was all or nothing, victory or death. (Some spoilers if you continue reading…)
He quit his job and dropped out of the white-collar world with all its trappings and amenities. Unemployed, he had to give up his residence. With a sleeping bag and a sackful of clothes he headed to Northwest London’s Gladstone Park, settling in among the homeless, transients, dog walkers and the occasional irritated park worker. His only solace, an A4 notepad and a pen.
Like the author, the main character Colossus Sosloss also quits his job, becomes homeless and sleeps in the park. He learns to adroitly dodge dog poo and falling bird droppings, then deftly hides his bagged personal belongings from the diligent and watchful park employees. Colossus observes the other homeless who reside at the park. Many of them with treatable or controllable mental illness but, in the post-Margaret Thatcher England, such individuals are human refuse. Dumped into society to fend for themselves and spiral downward amongst the neatly-trimmed hedges and glistening, manicured lawn of the sprawling public space.
The character’s travails are reminiscent of a Lewis Carroll-type adventure with subtle Dickensian undertones. Which include a lost parrot and an unfortunate man named Squirrel. We follow Colossus on his journey to the edge of sanity, with humorous interjections and clever idioms. A hero’s quest, that inevitably ends with subterfuge, realization and reflection.
Today, no longer homeless, Craig Stone is probably one of the most promising young writers to grace the indie and self-publishing world. Though at 31, Stone is a surprisingly mature author who seems to transcend the generations. His literary work is suitable for the very young and for those who have lived an interesting life
The Squirrel That Dreamt Of Madness is an imaginative tale that can only come from a brilliant, albeit delightfully demented, mind. Stone mixes humor with the cold, stark reality of life. Everything and everyone, is a metaphor for something either sinister or truthful. Gifted students may soon find this book on their required reading list for their advanced High School contemporary literature class.
The author does not have a long laundry list of writers who inspired him, though he definitely channels some Steinbeckian qualities (the novel was written during the height of the Great Recession) and J.D. Salinger’s, The Catcher in the Rye.
Like Hemingway who retreated to the wild and lawless pre-Castro Cuba to pen his magnum opus The Old Man and the Sea, Stone chose to immerse himself in a colder and wetter climate to experience what his character had to endure. The old adage, you write what you know, still rings resonantly true. Stone certainly writes what he knows, and writes it exceptionally well.
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RaeJoyce
Two books came immediately to mind as I read Craig Stone’s debut novel, “The Squirrel That Dreamt of Madness”. The first was Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s “One Hundred Years of Solitude” for the sheer joy and scope of the ride Stone takes the reader on. The second was Angela Carter’s “Several Perceptions”, one of my favourite reads. But these were just the first two, the comparisons go on, and on (just read the Amazon reviews if you don’t believe me), and yet they don’t quite manage to reduce what Craig Stone’s book is into a neat comparative package. Because, you see, “The Squirrel That Dreamt of Madness” is not quite like anything you’ll have ever read before. It’s philosophical without being showy, there’s an endearing quality to his prose, a lack of ego for all the showmanship his writing demonstrates. And it’s funny in that see how far you can take this (seriously, THAT far) way, reminiscent of Steve Martin in the film “Roxanne” where he gives twenty better insults about his nose than the oaf at the bar. I won’t give a synopsis here except to say it’s based on Stone’s own vagrant experience and if you ever wondered what the beardy dude on the park bench was thinking, you can bet you wouldn’t think it was this.
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Cloey.k
This book is laugh out loud funny. I had to check my laugh volume while reading in public places so that people wouldn’t think that I was “that crazy lady”. Craig Stone showed me that he has awesome storytelling skills with a story of a guy living in a park while living in the park – really? He pulled it off! I bet Mr. Stone could take any idea and turn it into an entertaining story. I have to admit that there were a few parts in the story where I felt embarrassed for Colossus. Then I would bring it all back to reality – anything goes when you are homeless and living in a park. I have never laughed at poo before and this book had me rolling on the floor! You have got to read this one – not for the poo it’s much more then that. I didn’t get bored and it kept my interest so I didn’t want to put it down. There were a few bumpy areas of concern for the edit police but I think that even you will like this one. Craig Stone has a new fan. I would read this one again and I am looking forward to his next book.
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T. Dittmer
A tale of a man who quits his day job to go live in the park, “The Squirrel That Dreamt of Madness” is a wildly entertaining reading experience.Though the story line may seem straightforward, the author manages to keep the reader off balance with kinky plot twists, a bombardment of incongruous imagery, and a cast of characters reminiscent of Alice In Wonderland.The style of the writing yanks the reader around like a well-engineered carnival ride, with short ducks down the rabbit hole and backstory that jumps away to far-flung locations… then suddenly back again. And just when the reader thinks that they’ve adjusted to the bumps and dips… that they no longer need to grasp the safety bar so tightly… the author throws in a sudden shot of insight into the plight of modern humanity.I thoroughly enjoyed the book, but would give any prospective readers one warning. If you plan on reading “The Squirrel That Dreamt of Madness”, be sure to have plenty of napkins on hand.
If you happen to be taking a sip when you hit one of those ridiculously ingenious images that come from the clever mind of Mr. Stone, whatever you’re drinking will end up coming out your nose.
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Linda Danca
Although the ratio of paragraph size in The Squirrel The Dreamt of Madness was rather small, Craig Stone’s almost lyrical style of metaphor causes the reader to occasionally pause, visualize, and laugh a second time at each one. Thus creating a much longer experience, and basically two laughs for the “prith” of one. This is not only one of the reasons I loved this book but also, as a traditional reader, also made me not full blown irritated, but enough to think Mr. Stone should be offered just a smaller dessert after dinner. I believe at one point I called him a “brat” aloud. And so brings me to another reason I recommend this book – plain and simple, it’s different. How a mind goes to these places (in a park) I do not know, but I am a peacock with two pinwheels in my beak, parading on the end zone with small bits of paper floating around me for going there.
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Jason Beech
Amazon lists Craig Stone’s The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness under humour, a genre that makes me think of Last of the Summer Wine, or Friends – something that you put on in the background as white noise to define your thoughts against. Or just to make a cup of tea to. In other words, it is something I would never buy.
The story is about Colossus Sosloss – named so by his father because he believes that names define character, and so a Jerome will always be a Jerome, whereas a Colossus will… – a man who chooses to quit his job and his conformist life to live in a park. Where he makes an enemy of the park attendant, befriends a masturbating lost soul, and gets accused of murdering and mutilating park animals. Fun.
The comedy name almost put me off, and the first few pages took some getting used to the masses of description – I’ll admit I almost gave up on it right there.
I’m extremely glad I didn’t. The premise of leaving your dull life behind is something everyone can identify with, but leaving it to live in a park may not elicit enough empathy. Why not bugger off to an Australian beach (I know, I know – visas), or tramp around European glories with your EU passport? To quit everything and simply live in a park seems absurd. Except Stone makes the park feel like paradise when compared to his work environment where his co-workers
“sit nodding into their screens like drinking birds, perpetual motion machines; biscuits in hand, crumbs falling into their coffee; slurping and silently farting themselves through the morning”.
Who wouldn’t want to live in a park with an office environment like that?
Colossus finds his dreams are not realised in his new life. He may have escaped his machine-like existence, but the loneliness of homelessness soon hits him when people’s eyes increasingly avert from him as his beard grows more and more unwieldy. Stone highlights the human condition beautifully as Colossus’ dream becomes nightmarish. Sleeping free under trees is no fun when lunatics roam the park watching you in your sleep, and the park attendant’s mission is to see you arrested for mutilating “his” animals. And you are never really free – Colossus remains attached to private possessions in his supposed freedom as he did when chained to the rat race – his sleeping bag for example: each day throwing up challenges in hiding it.
The plot is a good enough reason to read the book, but the real fun is in the fantastic imagery and asides Stone peppers throughout, with almost every one hitting the humour or surprise spot. Like this one, where another homeless person gets too close for comfort:
“He mutters a conglomerate of inebriated obscenities at me but they are laden with so much alcohol the words are heavy and fall from his mouth to the floor, dying from liver failure before they have any chance of reaching my ears”.
Genius. I love the follow through: “One of his words did not die and it lays isolated in the concrete path uncontrollably shaking”. The book is full of these gems.
There were times when I wondered where the story might head, seeming a little aimless. Colossus, we vaguely learn, is living in the park for writing inspiration, but books about writers rarely grab. However, it takes a dramatic turn late on with the authorities’ concern about someone going missing, giving the story an urgent kick for plot fanatics, and ending in farce and real fear, showing that Colossus really does grow on you.
I first heard of Craig Stone in an interview at Indie Author News and I wanted him to make it big from that point on. In real life he really did leave his job to live in a park under a tree, and stayed there until he wrote this book. The man is clearly bonkers, but if it produces stuff like The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness, then more authors need to do it.
Overall, I recommend the book for those who like a fresh twist on looking at the everyday. Plot fiends will find plenty to enjoy too. But “humour” does not do it justice. What about a new section called “If you want to have a proper belly laugh, Amazon recommends…”?
This review originally appeared on jdbeech.wordpress.com
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Lynne
Lynne rated it 5 of 5 stars
Very enjoyable and very funny!
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Susan Stec
A delightful read. The Squirrel That Dreamt Of Madness is brilliantly creative, often delightfully irrational, with a humorous look at the harshness of reality.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Bizarre and Brilliant
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
A friend told me to check out this author. A few short minutes later I’m following him on Twitter and devouring his autobiographical blurb. Then I bought this book. Best money I’ve spent all week. This book is wonderfully bizarre in all the right ways. It starts off mundane and every page you take a step closer to madness. It’s absolutely brilliant and I have no qualms about recommending it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Totally original and worth the read
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Don’t hesitate. Buy it, read it and love it. Twisted and twisty and dark and light all at the same time.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Haunting, hilarious, and…
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
I just finished this book and had to do it in the daytime b/c it was haunting my dreams. Don’t take that as a bad sign. It is an incredible read and the descriptions, while funny, really draw similarity where I had never seen it before. I searched long and hard for a free book on my kindle that wasn’t trashy romance or boring classic and this was just amazing. It’s a twisted human nature and human/nature story that I could hardly put down. I’m so impressed.
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Squirrel vs Parrot – A highly entertaining read.
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
From the first page this book had me. I picked it up on Amazon while it was free but I was prepared to pay money for it as I didn’t know it was free when I digitally walked into the store with my digital hand full of digital cash, having already decided I was going to buy it.
The book is unique, funny, original, quirky, raw and moving. It raises eyebrows. It leaves the reader asking questions, some of which are rhetorical, others are thankfully tidied up very nicely at the conclusion.
Craig Stone has a knack of picking the most appropriate character names, even if they are rather unconventional. The main character and narrator is Colossus Sosloss, who decides to live as a homeless man in Gladstone Park, London. Colossus tells us of his problems of living a homeless life, such as where to sleep, how to wash, where to store his bags of belongings, trivial things like that.
But Colossus is not alone. He tells of his experiences sleeping underneath Roald Dahl only to wake with a disabled fat man he calls Moonface, above him. We meet a midget park keeper who holds a grudge, we follow Colossus’ battles to understand the etiquette of dealing with mysterious fellow homeless men he calls Squirrel, Inbin & Hedges, and Worzel Bummidge. Interestingly, we meet an African Grey Parrot called Madness and its owners before the narrator meets them.
But when animals in the park start showing up brutally killed, Colossus is accused of being the culprit and having nowhere to turn, things start going down hill fast…
Overall I enjoyed the book despite a few niggling technicalities. Craig Stone likes to colour his narrative with many similes which, although entertaining, at times were like driving off the main road onto a rough and narrow dirt track surrounded by thick green vegetation with spiky thorns encroaching on both sides, quickly overwhelming the track, scratching the paintwork and hindering progress until we eventually reach the end where a sign reads, “you can go back to the main road now”.
An interesting editing challenge for a first person narrative, is deciding when to introduce characters the narrator has not yet met such that the reader is not suddenly surprised by their appearance towards the end of the story. This occurred with the parrot and his owners and with the description of the history of Squirrel. The justification is explained in the epilogue however it felt a little weak to me. However, I’m not sure I can suggest a better alternative.
It was certainly a different concept, very original and quite well executed. I’ll definitely read the prequel now. Life Knocks. Check it out.
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5.0 out of 5 stars the never ending story
By E. Kelly “a Christian” (Vancouver, British Columbia Canada) – See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)This book is so brilliant that i don’t want it to end, so i read it in bits and then sit around smiling for a month about those bits, then read a bit more.. i’m paranoid that one day the book will end and leave me alone, dreaming of squirrels instead of madness. 🙂 i refuse to let it end! grrr argh *splat*
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Read!
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
I found it very hard to put this book down (or close the Kindle app, whatever). The author does a grand job of immersing you into the story. For instance, I too began to feel uneasy about where the bags containing what little belongings he had were left, and if they would be there at all!This book often made me late for various appointments because I was so engrossed in it, I’d miss my stop on the subway. It’s that good.Full of laughs, suspense, and descriptions that keep you reading until that last page when you are seriously glad you picked this up. Get it. You won’t be disappointed at all!
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 5.0 out of 5 stars The sample alone is absolute gold
By Nunja Business (LA (Lower Alabama)) – See all my reviews
This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
I will be using my “one a month” Prime Membership freebie on this book on June 1.
The description intrigued me, but the sample engrossed me and impressed me and made me horribly disappointed when I came to the end.
That’s ok, it was just long enough to give me a real taste of exactly what Craig Stone writes.
Really looking forward to reading this and Stone’s subsequent work.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Liked It
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Great read, different, quirky, but with pathos and food for thought, undergirded by a real story. I do not recommend books lightly! Stuck with this one and it didn’t annoy me – high praise indeed! Also, FUNNY. Go for it!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tom Robbins Alert!
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Not since the early works of Tom Robbins have words been such an artful medium. Craig juggles them high in the air. They twist. They turn. And then land – right on your funny bone. A true literary romp. A fresh voice that reads with an ache for more. Next book, please, Craig. You’re a star. Five well-earned ones.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The awesomeness of madness
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
I laughed. I cried. I laughed so hard I cried. Then the pologue was over, and the book began. After the prologue I was already eager to tell others about the book, so I handed my phone to my mom (I read it on the Kindle app for iPhone)to let her sample the book. She read it until the battery on the phone died. The next day, the next morning, she asked me if I was busy with my phone and if she could borrow it to read the book I had lent her the previous night. I didn’t get to make any calls or texts, or read the book, until she was done reading it. After I had read it, yes, it’s that good. I had to pace myself, because I wanted the book to go on and on at the same time I couldn’t get enough of it. For me it was filled with epiphanies and affirmations, as well as being filled with colorful observations. It’s said that the hallmark of a good comedian is clever observation, and as funny as Squirrel is, it is that insightful as well. The same can be said for the author. I absolutely adore this book, look forward to re-reading it, and am currently thoroughly enjoing ‘Life Knocks’. I would love to own these books in printed form, and hope like hell Mr. Craig Stone continues to write.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hats off to the Busker
 This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
If you like books that take you away from the ordinary and give your view of daily park life a good shake, then you will love the Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness. Mr Stone has weaved an unusual tale that feels like being in a painting by Bruegel, which is being narrated by Spike Milligan. A truly weird, but descriptive world punctuated by some wonderful turns of phrase which will stay with you for a long, long time. Mr Stones writing is, in my opinion, well worthy of comparison to a Tom Sharpe novel for its wild eyed lunacy and comic punch. I’m truly convinced that Mr Stone will rise to become an accomplished author and that his work will stand the test of time. So, hats off to the busker and I am looking forward to reading his second book Life Knocks.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Magical words from a magical thinker
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Craig Stone has concocted a brilliant slice of existential word candy with his hilarious and heartbreaking novel. “Squirrel” is the story of Colossus Sosloss, a worker bee who abandons the comforts of the contemporary world to live a simpler existence in a park…and instead finds his life growing more complicated by the day. Trees named for beloved authors and filled with mental patients, undersized groundskeepers with anger management issues, a so-called monster of a man suspected of atrocities against animals and an elusive gray parrot called Madness flesh out the tale, told in Mr. Stone’s highly original and wonderfully melodic wordcraft. He says more in a single sentence than most writers can in a full paragraph. Highly recommended as a favorite read…and I’m anxiously awaiting the prequel I’ve heard is in the works. Follow him on Twitter under @craigstone_ for more of his literary fun on the daily.
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5.0 out of 5 stars You won’t forget this one!
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
“WOW” is the first word that comes to mind as I finished the book this morning. I first heard of this book through Twitter following the handle @Robolollycop. As if this name wasn’t interesting enough the tweets I would read were downright hilarious. This peeked my curiousity into getting back into reading. I haven’t sat down and read a book for a few years now, and I happened to get a Kindle Fire for Christmas. Needless to say this was my first download, and a steal for $2.99.
I began reading again and could not put this one down! I had to see what was coming next, what new characters we would meet and their individual stories. It’s hard to say much without giving away some of the story, but this book has some hilarious moments and characters that you will never forget.
I was sneered at during breaks at work while reading and chuckling/snorting to myself as I followed along. Craig Stone’s imagination and descriptive way of writing will keep you wanting more.
I can’t wait to see what is coming next, and would like to thank Craig for getting me back into reading once again.
Thank you Craig a.k.a
I will be sure to follow you and hope great things happen for you!
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5.0 out of 5 stars like kite-flying in a thunderstorm & catching a charge in a Leyden jar
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Fire up your kindle, bundle up your backpack, leave your preconceptions behind and join Colossus Sosloss as he presses F8 on his soul-sucking job, rolls his dreams out beneath his feet & bravely embarks, homeless, on a breathtaking adventure into a north London park. Be prepared to stay up reading bleary-eyed into the wee hours as you white-knuckle zip-line rides through a few adrenaline-addled passages, traverse misty heart-rending scenes, and are overcome by irrepressible mirth, rippling your belly, forced to escape through your mouth as billowy guffaws; marveling as you inhale each word almost like oxygen getting you to the next breath and as turns of phrase spin your mind out into gleeful somersaults down wildflower-spotted hillsides.
Like kite-flying in a thunderstorm & catching a charge in a Leyden jar, The Squirrel That Dreamt of Madness will illuminate the recesses of your brain, stimulate & resuscitate bits you may believe to be atrophied & shine light on your Everyday; reminding you to not just merely look but to See. Or to see with fresh-baked eyes, launching you on a swing straight up to the point where you feel you may flip backwards, speculating with that sensation in the pit of your stomach what will happen if you release your hold.
With modern-day bombardment of hollow, mind-numbing, blister-packed mediocrity & sensory overload teeming in sizzle without substance; with sense of purpose perhaps buried amongst crumbs under seat cushions and pre-packaged routine & microwavable evenings lackadaisically pulled on with the press of a button–for a change of pace, a shift in perspective or a time-out from the real world to try on a sorting hat of a fantastic one, do yourself a favor: put down the remote, skip the gym, get your face off of Facebook, leave the washing-up for later & treat yourself by adding this to your cart and checking out this lush, flowing, detailed tapestry of puckish, imaginative genius threaded with a colorfully-chequered treasure trove of characters, dyed with phantasmagorical hilarity and spun throughout with heart. I promise you, you will be delighted you did.
Be sure to keep an eye on more from author, Craig Stone, an inspiring, brilliant & boundless talent who “wields the universe to his dreams” through the tip of his ballpoint. His future is certain to be a “trip to awesome”. Although some would argue after this book, he’s already there.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Craig Stone has written a refreshing story that kept the Pages turning
 This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
This was a different kind of story, but once you stick to it after a few pages, you find that it is highly enjoyable. Author Craig Stone is a ‘wordsmith’ that is for sure and his story ‘The Squirrel That Dreamt Of Madness’ is one treat and feast of words. I wish there were more Authors like this who are willing to take the chance and write whatever he is thinking out of the norm of what publishers are seeking.
A masterpiece of thought and very highly suggested.
Way to go Craig Stone. An incomparable achievement for you and for us readers to now enjoy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Craig Stone weaves words like the Navajo weave blankets
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
I stumbled upon this book from a Twitter post, read the sample on Amazon and bought it on the spot. Craig Stone weaves words like the Navajo weave blankets. As I paged through the book and I attempted to make mental notes about how the author would turn a phrase I couldn’t keep up. The entire book is spent playing with words but it never gets pretentious or hollow. It’s simply a fun read. Just to quote a short sample of Stone’s lexicon mischievousness I’ll quote the first night our main character, Colossus Sosloss, spends in the park as a tramp – he says “I wait for sleep to run me over and put me in the boot of its black car and drive me into tomorrow.”
The mind numbing cast of characters that are introduced only make us wish that we could spend an hour or two rambling around the authors mind to see what sort of pharmaceuticals his brain is producing. There is an angry midget, a fat guy who won’t come down from his tree least the ground bite him, a parrot whom everyone seems to be pursuing, PC Whirled an oddly named cop and so many others that this review would be as long as the Kindle Book if I listed them.
I would not be surprised to see Ben & Jerry turn this book into an ice cream flavor. So many of the other reviewers have drawn a parallel between this work of Craig Stone and many of the offbeat comedic geniuses of our time. Every one of them is correct AND more. I’ve read through the day and my only disappointment in the book is that there is not more of it to read tomorrow. Come on, Craig, get busy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Crazy,upside down and all around enchanting and hilarious
 This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Warning: Once you start this story it will be impossible to put down. Colossus Sosloss,is a name that will be branded in the back of my head for a long time. Not because the name sounds like a catchy tune, but because of the man behind the name. Be prepared to laugh out loud, fall in love and itch for more. Sam Rockwell was my Colossus.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Funniest Book I Have Ever Read
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
This book is actually the funniest thing I have ever read in my life. I enjoy a humorous book but up until now had never found one that actually made me laugh out loud. This book made me laugh out loud. I laughed so much I cried. I laughed so much that other members of my family stopped what they were doing to stare at me and ask me what on earth was so funny. Suicidal budgies are funny – and I know that sounds wrong – but in context, suicidal budgies are hysterical. The author has a great talent for clever humour and word play and what I would almost describe as Python-esq humour. As well as being funny this book has an engaging storyline, interesting plot twists and a protagonist who is hugely likeable. Everything about this book just clicked for me and I’ll definitely be on the look out for further books by this author. Highly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Best book I’ve read this year…
 This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)

Keep your eye on this guy. If Kerouac, Vonnegut and Douglas Adams all had a literary baby together, his writing would be that baby. He’s talent-in-the-raw and his original descriptions, quirky perspective and striking sense of humor left me literally laughing out loud while reading to the extent that it annoyed people around me. I was dying to know what happened next, yet sad to finish it because I wanted more.

Trust me. Read the book. Thank me later.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Massively brilliant
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Absolutely brilliant, this guy. This book is shockingly good. I had no idea what to expect from it when I bought it. Once in a while a work will grab you by the nape of the neck and pull you in. This one certainly does. Craig is a fantastically funny man. I’m not certain he INTENDS to be either…he just IS. Often, true genius lies in the most unassuming people. Some have it, some don’t. Craig has it in SPADES. Best $3.00 I have ever spent. Please write more, Craig. The masses need voices like yours.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A gem of a book
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Take a stroll with philosophical, run from sinister, camp with funny and get chased by surreal. Oh and don’t forget madness. For a bargain price you can share time with Colossus; he will open your eyes to [park]life.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Madness!
 This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Amazing storytelling that puts together the most out there ideas and the basic nature of human emotion, now for the prequel!
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Madness that dreamt up this story
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
I read this while on holiday with some friends, we’d be lying on the beach discussing how our respective books were but to be honest Temptation Island didnt have anything on this book ! wacky, weird, funny, and just plain insane. But as odd as it was there was a great story in there too. certainly a holiday read i wont forget in a hurry!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Glorious and tangential!
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This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
Craig Stone’s writing style is – as far as I know – unique. Featuring a multitude of glorious, tangential similes, The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness is an insight into the bizarre thought-processes we often have but rarely share. It’s ostensibly the tale of a young man who begins living in a park, but the thoughts and occasional meandourous backstories lift the story from this simple premise to an engaging and humourous journey. Throw-in a case of wildlife murder and a side order of treetop masturbation and you’ve got a truly thought-provoking independent read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fresh and funny
(REAL NAME)
 This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
This one was a pleasant surprise. The author has a fab writing style and it was great fun to follow his slightly bizarre lines of thought. It was also edgy and I had to remind myself to breathe a few times. Great fun from start to finish.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An ode to humanity,
This review is from: The Squirrel that Dreamt of Madness (Kindle Edition)
They say with madness come moments of clarity, sometimes genius. In this book the madness also brings with it moments of truth, beauty and at times involuntary, and at other times slightly inappropriate, laughter. You would do yourself a great disservice by not reading this book.
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Thank you for reading the reviews!
Please buy the book and try the experience for yourself by clicking on one of the below links…
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Thank you! :)x
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Squirrel UK Amazon link:

 http://bit.ly/STDOM

Squirrel US Amazon link:

http://bit.ly/USSquirrel

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